Simple Tactics to increase sales for your business

Lead Generation is the process of collecting data and attracting the buyer’s interest in your service or product. To generate sales lead is not a single process, that is a combination of several approaches depending on the business type and skills. Finding a new strategy will take more time. So there are certain proven or tested methods for confidential lead generation.

Every business growth depends on sales and marketing. To generate sales lead we have to put more effort to find out the proper strategy for our business. Most of the marketers say generating leads is one of their top challenges. Your website has good traffic but there is no sale.

 Whatever the problem, here I mentioned some proven techniques which can apply to your business to increase your leads and sales.

Email Marketing

Email Marketing is one of the proven methods for lead generation and also the best strategy in this changing world. Marketers believe that email marketing rules are big assets to earn. An email has a better reach than social. The most beneficial in email marketing is we have a direct line to our audience compare with SEO and Social media. 

Email is a great way of storing your clients active and engaged with your service. It is not a channel for lead generation with its own, it’s still a necessary tool in our overall lead generation tactic and can increase ROI from other exercises. Remember, the more engaged your customers are with your service, the better their withholding and ability for using other services or products you offer. 

Email Marketing practices:

1.      Finding the right people

2.      Attractive subject lines – that will increase customers interest to open the email

3.      Segment the customer list based on interest

4.      … Read the rest

Website Hosting Features Provided By VPS Servers

Image result for Website Hosting Features Provided By VPS Servers

There is no wonder that so many individuals have begun building their own personal functionality-rich sites availing of cost-free web apps that are easy enough to use even for inexperienced users. And owing to all the charge-free web page themes that are obtainable on the web, quite a lot of websites are being launched, which need a website hosting service such as the VPS one.

What is Virtual Private Web Server Hosting?

Website hosting is a solution, which permits you to upload your site on a server in order to take it online and a VPS hosting server  is a private virtual web server – it functions as a dedicated server, conferring root-level access to the client, but it shares the system resources of the physical machine with other virtual server accounts. In other words, private virtual server hosting is a web hosting service offered on a virtual server, which is getting more and more popular owing to the autonomy you have in terms of server setup. virtual servers are often utilized by web developers and programmers as a test platform where they can confirm how their product would behave under different conditions.

Private Virtual Server Hosting Varieties

If we begin to differentiate at the basic level, we need to start with the separate Operating Systems, the most prominent varieties being:

Linux private virtual server web hosting – it is usually favored thanks to the lower setup and maintenance charges and the possibility to modify the Operating System following the requirements of the customers based on the skills of the admin because Linux is open-source.

Windows virtual web server hosting – Being more expensive renders Windows a final resort when you would like to host applications that cannot function on another OS and there are many of them, so the … Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest